What Are Binary Files on Usenet

By: Fast Usenet on: October 11th, 2010

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What is a Binary File?

A binary file is a non-text file that is encoded as a text file so that it can be transferred across the Usenet network. A binary file is any file that is not just normal text. When a Usenet user wants to be able to download videos, images, or software they will have to make certain that they are a subscriber to a Usenet service that provides access binary file newsgroups.

FastUsenet.org is a great service for this as we offer high retention and outstanding article completion. New users will also want to make sure they have the required software that will encode the file to text when posting it, or decode the file back to its original state when downloading it.

What are Multi-Part Binaries?

Most of the binary files found on Usenet are what are considered multi-part binaries. The reason they are called this is due to the fact the files must be split up by the people posting the messages, as most news servers will not accept files with more than 20,000 lines.

This means that a 700MB file will often be split up into 30 to 40 parts so that the news servers will accept it. In order for you to use the file on your computer you will need to download all 30 or 40 parts of that file. Newsreaders like SABnzbd make it very easy for you to do that.

Encoding Binary Files

When users post the binary file, they must be sure to encode the binary file. What this “encoding” does, is it turns the binary file into text so that the server will accept it as a valid file. When users download these files, they have to decode the message from text back to its original binary file so that they have the file they wanted. Today there are many newsreaders that will do both the encoding and decoding of these files for you.

There are many users that argue that binary files are not what Usenet is about, and it destroyed the image of Usenet. On the other hand, binary files are what allowed Usenet to develop into what it is today: a strong, growing, and thriving community of peers that are able to exchange information in the form of text and binaries.